HOMOGROUND

Watch video for new Sleater-Kinney song “Bury Our Friends”

feministcards:

Did you hear? Sleater-Kinney is back! Check out their video above for new song “Bury Our Friends” from their upcoming album No Cities to Love.

Get tickets for their upcoming tour and politely yell-ask Carrie Brownstein and Janet Weiss to sign yr cards. Oh you don’t have a Feminist Playing Cards deck? How about making that happen.

don’t miss our CMJ showcase on Thursday Oct 23rd! @friendsandloversbk http://ift.tt/1y3IQ4o http://ift.tt/1vL0b3V

don’t miss our CMJ showcase on Thursday Oct 23rd! @friendsandloversbk http://ift.tt/1y3IQ4o http://ift.tt/1vL0b3V

mirror into the future #homospotting http://ift.tt/1xZZj9E http://ift.tt/1wQTVo8

mirror into the future #homospotting http://ift.tt/1xZZj9E http://ift.tt/1wQTVo8

glitterlustdc + more playing the official #cmj @homoground showcase! #NYC #queermusic re-grammed from @robidlight

glitterlustdc + more playing the official #cmj @homoground showcase! #NYC #queermusic re-grammed from @robidlight

"No matter how much I learned, self-taught, or understood how we’re taught to comprise; girl socialization required years of deconstruction. My early relationships with other girls were laced with vanity and competitiveness. We were taught to prejudge one another; hate each other, and conceal our love for each other. She dressed like me, looked like me, was bullied like me, sometimes I wanted to kiss her, but I called her a bitch because she wouldn’t look at me. I thirsted for the girl solidarity I embraced with strangers and heard of in punk rhetoric, but could never share with Selene. The songs I would hear would say that girls fought back together—but was this the truth? Or did it require more growth to abide by that? This was what I knew then. We, as the angst-ridden teenage girls, were taught complacency and susceptibility. We wanted to untie the restraints stifling our anger and unravel our ability to fight. Growing up in skin that curves dissent from the girl-stereotype meant growing up with towering defenses. My defenses came in the shape of slander and a need for others to prove themselves. Selene was like this too. And maybe it was just easier to hate Selene rather than to prove myself to her. This is where my competitiveness stemmed from.”
—excerpt from Indestructible by Cristy C. Road, Queen of Hearts.
Learn more and submit to the Feminist Playing Cards project here

"No matter how much I learned, self-taught, or understood how we’re taught to comprise; girl socialization required years of deconstruction. My early relationships with other girls were laced with vanity and competitiveness. We were taught to prejudge one another; hate each other, and conceal our love for each other. She dressed like me, looked like me, was bullied like me, sometimes I wanted to kiss her, but I called her a bitch because she wouldn’t look at me. I thirsted for the girl solidarity I embraced with strangers and heard of in punk rhetoric, but could never share with Selene. The songs I would hear would say that girls fought back together—but was this the truth? Or did it require more growth to abide by that? This was what I knew then. We, as the angst-ridden teenage girls, were taught complacency and susceptibility. We wanted to untie the restraints stifling our anger and unravel our ability to fight. Growing up in skin that curves dissent from the girl-stereotype meant growing up with towering defenses. My defenses came in the shape of slander and a need for others to prove themselves. Selene was like this too. And maybe it was just easier to hate Selene rather than to prove myself to her. This is where my competitiveness stemmed from.”

—excerpt from Indestructible by Cristy C. Road, Queen of Hearts.

Learn more and submit to the Feminist Playing Cards project here

Accent theme by Handsome Code

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